Greyhound Bus 1960s, or Help me with my book

downloadAs part of the re-write I’ve had to move a lot of stuff around and, now, rather than riding on a bus rented just for my main seven characters there are now only two main characters and they ride from Utah to Indiana on a Greyhound bus.

Being the Englishman I am, I have never ridden a Greyhound bus (in England the equivalent is called the National Express) and I have especially not been on one in 1968. However maybe you have. If so could you tell me about it and answer a few questions.

1. Could you smoke/drink on them?

2. Were they nice and clean or cheap and nasty? Were they comfortable?

3. Were people social on them? Did they chat or sit in stoic silence?

4. What kind of people would ride them?

 

 

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “Greyhound Bus 1960s, or Help me with my book

  1. We just got back from a Greyhound Bus trip from Idaho to Texas and back. It allowed us a close look at the current state of America and real people. I can tell you some interesting stories if you are interested. Here are the answers to your questions plus a couple you should have asked. Can you carry a weapon: I had a lock blade knife with a 3″ blade in my pocket. Security? : They searched our bags in Houston, Texas and took Linda’s hairspray (wanded us, but did not find my knife). Breakdowns? : Yes, I found the problem and another passenger got a serviceman to make the repair. The driver stood by and talked on his cellphone.

    1. Could you smoke/drink on them?
    No smoking, drinking, drugs, profanity or hairspray.
    2. Were they nice and clean or cheap and nasty? Were they comfortable?
    They were reasonably clean and as comfortable as possible.
    3. Were people social on them? Did they chat or sit in stoic silence?
    People were very friendly and told some very interesting stories.
    4. What kind of people would ride them?
    Every kind you can imagine.

    Like

      • Story #1: We met a very nice young man recently returned from two tours of duty with the USMC in Afghanistan. While there, both his parents died and his wife divorced him. He came back to the states with severe PTSD and a four year old daughter now living in Alaska. On his way to see his daughter his old car broke down in Bellevue, Washington. During this fiasco his billfold and personal items were stolen. After selling the car for scrap, he hitchhiked down the California coast working at odd jobs. With no driver’s license and no birth certificate he does not even exist in America. He is really screwed up from all the PTSD drugs his ungrateful government gave him and has real problems dealing with society. His only hope was to try and make it to a veterans hospital in Denver, Colorado where he was told he could find some help. He did not beg for help or money from us. He was just thankful for someone to listen to his story. Our hearts go out to this young man and the thousands of others like him.

        Like

      • Story #2: We met “Disability Woman” in the Denver bus station. We had heard others on the bus talking about her, but our first meeting occurred while we were waiting, first in line, for the Boise bus. A hispanic woman aggressively approached me and demanded to see my ticket and boarding pass. I deduced who she might be and did not say a word. She got more aggravated and informed me that she had a disability pass that allowed her and her male accomplice to board first. I did not move so she shoved her bags in front of me and sat by them on the floor. A very nice black man that we had been traveling with was standing with me and watched the entire show. He is a drywall worker and has had problems with illegal Mexicans taking work from him. We took this opportunity to have a rather loud discussion about what we had just witnessed and the rude behavior of Disability Woman and her ilk. Disability Woman took all this in and gave us a very ugly stare, which we enjoyed greatly. Thankfully Karma was present that night. After she forced her way on the bus and took the very front seats, the rest of us boarded. The bus was not too crowded and we were able to get two seats so that we could stretch out in comfort. After a while Disability Woman realized that she had made a horrible mistake with her seat choice. She and her companion walked the entire bus, but there were no seats to be found. Karma took her healthy hand, and feeling no disability, guided her back to her crappy seats.

        Like

  2. Story #3: When our bus broke down in Vernal, Utah us passengers had to solve the problem. While the Mexicans played their fiesta music and the bus driver walked around talking on his phone, Bama and I took over. Bama was a nice young man we met at the Boise bus station. We soon figured out that we would be travelling as far as Denver together. The problem was a leak in the bus air brake system. It sounded like a valve to me and Bama went to a nearby auto parts store to try and locate a mechanic that had a valve. The driver told us it would be 8 hours before a rescue bus arrived. Not acceptable. A nice woman at the auto parts store found us a mechanic. He came, fixed the bus and we were on the road again in less than 2 hours. However, we missed our connecting busses in Denver and poor Bama had to spend the night there. We were lucky and caught another bus headed to Houston. So, if you ride the hound you need to be prepared to take charge while the driver talks on the phone. The only thing the driver did was to stop the Mexicans from playing their loud music.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s